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World TB Day 2011

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PRESS RELEASE: World TB Day 2011

New TB test to detect more people who need DR-TB treatment

Médecins Sans Frontières report says fixing drug supply and price problems is urgent.

Geneva/Johannesburg, 24 March 2011 – A promising new diagnostic test will finally help detect more people with drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB), increasing the urgency to solve major problems around the pricing and supply of DR-TB medicines, according to a new report by the international medical humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières. DR-TB is on the rise, but less than 7% of 440,000 new cases each year receive treatment, and DR-TB kills 150,000 people annually. read more.

Read an Interview with Dr. Francis Varaine on the new test.

REPORT

Click to view Report PDF.

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Share in my solitude: Living with drug-resistant TB

In this photofilm, Happiness Dlamini talks about her experiences of living with the treatment for drug-resistant TB. Happiness, who has a four-year old daughter and an eleven-year old son, lives in the Shiselweni Region of Swaziland.

Drug-Resistant TB: A Slow and Painful Process

Photographer and Médecins Sans Frontières field worker Misha Friedman visited Médecins Sans Frontières' tuberculosis project in Nukus, western Uzbekistan, where he met patients with heartbreaking stories.