email this page    print    RSS

Field news

Support our work by making a tax-deductible donation to charity today.

Where we are working

More from Haiti

ABC News: Tasmanian doctor helping victims of sexual violence

Tasmanian doctor Lisa Searle was just 15 herself when she decided she wanted to work for a humanitarian medical aid organisation.

“Every single case we saw was complicated, and touching and difficult and emotional”

Dr Lisa Searle from Tasmania has recently returned from Haiti where she was setting up a new sexual violence clinic in Port-Au-Prince.more

More on Natural Disaster

Pakistan Earthquake response: after initial influxes of injured, Médecins Sans Frontières assessing further needs

An earthquake variously recorded at between 7.6 and 8.1 on the Richter scale rocked parts of northeastern Afghanistan and northwestern Pakistan on the afternoon of 26 October. Médecins Sans Frontières medical projects in north...more

Myanmar flood victims vulnerable to Dengue Fever

Two weeks after severe flooding affected an estimated one million people across Myanmar, Médecins Sans Frontières is expanding its support to the government’s response in both Rakhine State and Sagaing Region. This will both help...more


Subscribe to me on YouTube

Haiti: Second quake hits the capital

Haiti / 21.01.2010

Patient with two broken legs receives medical treatment from Médecins Sans Frontières field workers in Carrefour. © Julie Remy

Port au Prince, 21 January: Médecins Sans Frontières teams have been working through the long queues of patients waiting for treatment and surgery, even as Port-au-Prince was shaken again by a very substantial aftershock this morning.

In Choscal hospital, where two operating theatres have been working round the clock for days to deal with the seriously injured, the patients were so alarmed by the tremors that they once again had to be taken out of the building and put into tents in the grounds outside. The operating theatres have continued to work with four surgical teams rotating through the day.

In Carrefour hospital, the team has started psychological support for the patients who have had limbs amputated and their families. A different form of intensive post-operative care is underway as physiotherapy work with burns patients has started in another hospital, while the dialysis treatment of crush victims continues in the big General Hospital. Six patients have now been treated with dialysis and the team is using a detection test to identify other patients with crush injuries who are in need of this intensive care.

Every functional operating theatre is used night and day, while logisticians are racing to set up new ones or rehabilitate damaged ones. Médecins Sans Frontières surgical teams have been carrying out an average of 130 operations per day for the last few days and this is increasing as new surgical teams start work. There are now 10 operating theatres, 7 in Port-au-Prince hospitals (Choscal, Trinité, Carrefour and Chancerelle hospitals) and 3 in towns in the west of the capital (Leogane and Jacmel). In addition, minor surgical procedures like cleaning and removing dead tissue from wounds are taking place in small operating theatres in Trinité and Pacot hospitals.

Capacity will further increase in the near future, as additional operating theatres are being prepared in Port-au-Prince and in the west of the island (Leogane and Grand-Goave). The inflatable hospital with two operating theatres and 100 beds is emerging on a field in Port-au-Prince. The construction team expects to have it working on Friday morning.


Location Map - Haiti -

Powered by 29travels

Thanks to the generous support of donors, Médecins Sans Frontières provides emergency, independent, medical humanitarian action to people living in extreme circumstances.

more info

We are always looking for competent people who are willing to live and work within an international team, share their skills and dedicate their time to support our...

more info